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Archive for February 27th, 2017

img_5288Worries We Have Always With Us

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink or about your body, what you will wear.”  At first blush these words from Matthew 6 all sound well and good, but only up to a point.  They sound like they come from the lips of someone who hasn’t got a care in the world.  We must assume that the speaker has plenty to eat and plenty to wear, and obviously he presumes everyone else does too.  So what’s the point of worrying about all these things?  People should not tie themselves into knots about these cares, and instead they should focus on the bigger picture — whatever that is.

It’s easy to tell people not to worry about having enough to eat if you have more than enough yourself.  It’s easy to tell people not to fret about clothing, especially if you have a storage closet bulging with clothes that you’ve not touched in two or three years.  On the other hand, if you are running short of all these things, then your perspective on this advice is entirely different.  If life is tenuous and you’re hanging on by your fingernails, and if you desperately depend on the charity of others, then this advice can seem pretty silly.  For such people there can be no days off or weekends away in the struggle of life.

Obviously, then, Jesus must be thinking about something else entirely when he suggests people should not worry about all of this stuff.  And we know that Jesus did care, because the gospels tell us so.  Jesus was not callous to the needs of others, and on more than one occasion he dropped everything he was doing to tend to the hunger of the people standing in front of him.  Jesus was not indifferent to the suffering of others, because he tended to the physical needs of a paralytic and the blind and the deaf and those possessed by demons.  Jesus cared, we have to believe, but he also cared about the transcendent value of the people whom he encountered.

img_5256One of the ironies of life is that you need not be poor to obsess with having enough to eat or wear.  Your bank account need not be empty to focus your best energies on the acquisition of more wealth.  And here we begin to grasp what Jesus is talking about.  In and of themselves wealth and food and clothing have importance, and so we put them in the category of “necessities.”  But the consumption of these necessities is not what life is all about.  There’s more to life, and for Jesus that life centers on the kingdom of God.  From our membership in the kingdom of God derives any and all things that have meaning.

“Seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given you as well.”  That’s the advice that Jesus gives, and it points to the origins of Christian life.  For Christians the very meaning of life derives from God’s act of creation.  God created the world and all in it, and God saw that it was good.  And as good as everything else may be, we have to believe that we too fall into the category of the good.  That goodness is the tie that binds us to one another.

What concerns Jesus is not the piling up of food and clothing, because despite the old adage, it is not clothes that make the man or woman.  Rather, respect for others and the love of neighbor constitute the foundation for Christian life.  That’s what really matters, and without these we are merely consumer units in the national economy.

img_5244Nobility is a seldom-used word today, though perhaps it should be used a little more often.  In its traditional meaning nobility referred to a line of aristocratic people who descended from a few people who possessed some heroic character.  They had accomplished something exceptional, and they had achieved status that they could bequeath to their descendants.  But nobility says little or nothing about their descendants, each of whom may have lived worthwhile or worthless lives.  That’s not the kind of nobility we want to promote; and anyway, it’s too late for most of us to be reborn into such families.

Rather, the kind of nobility to which we should aspire derives from this very teaching of Jesus.  This nobility is a nobility of purpose, a nobility of service, a nobility of concern for the poor and the sick and the disadvantaged.  Above all, it is a nobility that shows in deeds rather than in pedegree.

img_5255This nobility of purpose produces the kind of life that Jesus speaks about in Matthew 6.  It is a nobility that comes from being citizens of the kingdom of God.  And the charter for that nobility rests upon the two great commandments — the love of God and the love of neighbor.

In the context of the love of God and love of neighbor everything falls into place in Christian life.  Nothing can be more important than that, and yet nothing can be unimportant in that light.  Seek first the kingdom of God and all else will be provided.  That’s not some sort of bargain that we drive with God so that we’ll get food and clothing.  Rather, it’s an ideal that yields life a hundredfold.

img_5257Notes

+This was a rather busy week for me, and one highlight that took place on February 22nd was the talk I gave at the Boca Grande, FL, civic library.  I spoke on the legacy of James J. Hill at Saint John’s, which endures most noticeably in the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library.  Boca Grande is not such an unusual site for such a talk, because Jerome Hill, grandson of the railroad baron, helped in the design of the local Catholic Church in Boca Grande.  A bust of Jerome sits in HMML and greets all who enter.  Another grandchild of James J. Hill, Gertrude Ffolliott, lived with her husband Peter in Boca Grande, and we were friends for many years before their passing.  She too was a friend to HMML.

+On February 24-26 I gave a retreat to members of the Western Association of the Order of Malta.  The gathering took place in Menlo Park, CA.

+On February 22nd the monks of Saint John’s Abbey celebrated the Mass of Christian Burial of our confrere, Fr. Magnus Wenninger.  For nearly all of his many years in teaching he taught at Saint Augustine’s College, the high school that Saint John’s founded and staffed in Nassau, Bahamas.  Fr. Magnus was one of the world authorities on polyhedrons, and he wrote extensively on the subject.  Included among his works was one text published by Cambridge University Press.

img_5291+The photos in today’s post show the Benedictine monastery of Sant Pau del Camp in Barcelona.  Founded in the 10th century, it is today a hidden gem that few tourists visit.  It is a tiny place, and at its height it had no more than nine monks.  Today it serves as a parish church, and they are keenly aware of the architectural significance of the place.  When I arrived to visit, the gates were locked, but the parish sectretary graciously let me in when I explained that I had come all the way from Minnesota, just to see this monastery — and the rest of Barcelona, of course.  She gave me twenty minutes, which was just enough.

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