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Archive for September 3rd, 2018

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Buried Talents

Better known for his reliance on nature and agriculture to color his parables, Jesus nonetheless did reference other topics every now and again.  Still, his allusions to the business world are few and far between, and that scarcity makes them all the more remarkable.  Small wonder, then, that his reference to banking in Matthew 25 raised my eyebrows when it showed up in the lectionary for last Saturday.

In that passage Jesus describes a householder who doled out resources to the servants, only to discover that one of them had buried the talents rather than risk losing them.  Jesus concludes with the enigmatic observation that it would be better to put the funds in the bank where they would draw interest rather than sit idly, not accomplishing much of anything for anybody.

37338264-697E-4CC3-93F1-6433C67A8E4BI note the enigma here because in the ancient Hebrew world usury — the charging of interest on a loan — was forbidden.  That ban transferred into the Christian experience, and only in the 13th century did Christian theologians find a way around the prohibition.

So does Jesus condone usury in this case?  Probably not.  But what he is suggesting is the gravity of any situation in which people bury their talents rather than risk using and then losing them.  Nothing justifies such waste, and in this case Jesus might very well be suggesting that it is an offense worse than usury.

Beyond that, I tease out one further inference from the banking world.  A loan from the bank is not a gift.  A loan is never meant to become the personal property of the recipient, and in fact the bank eventually does want its money back.  In the meantime the loan is meant to accomplish something worthwhile.  But it’s definitely not meant to be hidden away to be counted and admired — but not used.

The same is true with any of the talents that God gives to us.  They’re meant to be on loan, in hopes that we will do something useful with them.  They are not meant as gifts to be hoarded as personal property, because they are meant to be used in service to others.

I’m not going to start listing what I think are my own talents, but I will share one exercise that I do now and again to remind myself that I don’t live solely for my own benefit.  One of the easiest expressions of respect and support for others is the simple greeting I can give when I pass them in the hall.  Certainly there are moments when I don’t feel like doing it, but I also know that sometimes even a simple greeting of respect can make all the difference in the world to someone who may be down in the dumps.  That’s when I remind myself that holding back does no good for anyone.  It doesn’t make me a better person, nor does it make me richer.  If the truth be told, I’m actually diminished as a person when I refrain from doing the simple good that I can do.

1A6962AE-CB4D-4139-8471-42C8A7223D23Support for one another is in the power of us all, but it’s only one of the many talents God gives to us.  But that talent only becomes a gift when we give it away.

NOTES

+On September 1st I participated in the wedding of my friend, Pierre Brunel, in San Francisco.  It didn’t quite count as a destination wedding, since it was a practical meeting point for most everyone.  Only 25 of the 165 in attendance were from the Bay Area, while the rest came from France, the east coast of the United States, and Australia.  The bride, Natalie, and Pierre both live in Sydney, Australia, and there they will make their home.

+The other major event of the week was my visit with one of my confreres to the State Fair of Minnesota.  I had not been in years, and visits to the animal barns are my chief interest.  The highlight was the barn that showed newborns, including the lambs in the photo at bottom.

+The three photos above show art housed in the Schuntzen Museum in Cologne.  At top is a panel of stained glass, with John the Baptist at left, ca. 1528, originally in the Charterhouse in Breisgau.  Below that is a carving of John the Baptist, pointing to the Lamb of God, made ca. 1480 by Master Tilman.  Next is another statue, dated ca. 1425, by Hans von Judenburg.  At bottom are some newborn lambs of God, at the State Fair of Minnesota.

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