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Posts Tagged ‘Mona Lisa’

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To Lourdes Once More

Why would anyone want to go to Lourdes for a tenth time?  Since I’ll be going this week as a chaplain in the Order of Malta’s annual pilgrimage to Lourdes, and since I’ve done so nine times already, I guess I’m one who will have to cough up an answer by pilgrimage’s end.

I remember well my first pilgrimage to Lourdes.  It seems so long ago, and by now nine pilgrimages have blurred into one, simply because the routine has scarcely changed through the years.  Each year some 350 of us from the Western Association arrive and join three or four thousand other Malta members from around the world.  Together, as members and volunteers and the sick, we gather to pray and process and dine and do other pilgrim things for a week.  Then we pack up and go home.  Fifty-one weeks later many return to do it all over again.  And if ten times seems like a lot, it’s small potatoes compared to the 25 or 30 trips that some have made.

A8EC2DBF-607B-42C6-A1E1-3F25CFF218DBPeople go to Lourdes for all sorts of reasons — and for no good reason at all.  What stands out from my own first pilgrimage was my hesitation.  Being of a more stoic temperament, and working from the vantage point of a medieval historian, I entertained a lot of personal caution.  Would this be too devotional for my tastes?  Would all the religious trappings leave me cold?  Might it all prove to be some form of escapism from the real challenges that people face?  These may seem like strange questions to come from a monk, but those were mine.

Those fears were tucked into the baggage that I took to Lourdes, but by the end of my first pilgrimage I realized how wide-of-the-mark my apprehensions had been.  Lourdes, it turned out, was no place for religious or emotional escapism.  Nor was Lourdes in the business of promising physical healing.  Unexplained healings do occur now and again, but spiritual healing is what Lourdes is about.  So people arrive expecting all sorts of things, and sometimes nothing at all.  But people go home touched intimately by the spiritual healing that takes place.

E2A5FA47-C7B7-4C50-AC56-6AF33D08E09EI’m under no illusion that this week’s visit to Lourdes will replicate my first.  It will be more like the next eight of them.  It will reflect my hard-won opennesss to seeing Christ in the sick and the poor.  It will reflect my appreciation for Christ working through the hands of the members of the Order and the volunteers.

I already know why I’m going to Lourdes for a tenth time, because my early skepticism opened my eyes to things I’d not seen so clearly before.  People come to Lourdes gifted with all sorts of talents and burdened with foibles.  People also come with ailments that range from the physical to the spiritual.  But everybody leaves Lourdes a little better than when they came.  They leave with a little or a lot of growth behind them.  They’ve experienced something that is sacramental in its widest sense, because they’ve seen the Lord at work all around them.

That’s not what I expected to see when I first went to Lourdes;  but it’s what I’ve been privileged to see every time since.

2170FD2F-70D3-4B73-BEAA-B81933FA83B0NOTES

+Last week was rather quiet until I arrived in Paris on Saturday the 28th.  The charter flight that most in our group took leaves from Los Angeles, and it has the virtue of landing near Lourdes.  But it adds two days to the trip if I go to Los Angeles to meet it.  So I go from Minneapolis to Paris directly.  And I go a bit early so as to be alert when the group arrives.

+On Sunday the 29th I joined a quarter of the population of Paris and its entire inventory of tourists for a visit to the Louvre.  I’ve never seen such mobs in a museum before, and one hopeful note was the thought that at least in Paris a museum can be bigger than even the NFL.  There’s a glimmer of hope there, somewhere.

The galleries were jammed, and one moment of triumph came when our small party glimpsed the Mona Lisa, who gazed at us over the heads of several hundred gawkers.  One in our group even got a picture — using his telephoto lens.

Museum-going these days is not what it used to be, and not for the better.  The Louvre is massive, and it’s easy to get lost and a challenge to locate a particular piece of art.  Complicating the scene are the herds of people whose eyes are glued to their cell phones.  Two things eventually dawned on me.  One, these herds went where their apps told them to go.  Second, most weren’t looking directly at the art.  For all they knew they could have been in a train station or out on a street.  But at least they got to check off the Louvre from their to-do lists.

As for me, I had taken my camera along, but the place was just too crowded to take good photos.  However, I added two bits to my personal storehouse of wisdom.  Visit the Louvre in the off-season, when the crowds thin out.  Second, try and look directly at the art.  Sometimes it can be even more interesting than a cell phone.

+The first three photos in today’s post are exterior shots of the Louvre.  It’s always good to remember that it was built to be a royal palace, but when the French ran out of kings they turned it into a museum.  Among the more neglected galleries are the medieval, which is fine by me.  Above is a 13th-century stone fragment of Saint Matthew writing his gospel, under the direction of an angel.  It used to be in the cathedral of Chartres.  Below is the tomb of Philip Pot (1428-1493), grand seneschal of Burgundy.  It once stood in a chapel at the Abbey of Citeaux.  I had that sculpture all to myself.

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