Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Portsmouth NH’

img_3912Routine:  The Foundation for Change

“When was the last time you did something for the very first time?”  So the greeting card I held in my hand asked, and I took it as a test of my flexibility and spontaneity.  To be perfectly honest, I had never posed that question to myself;  so my response was a forthright “Just now!”  Clearly I had passed that test with flying colors.  Next question, please.

Most people are creatures of habit, and on that score monks get higher marks than most.  After all, Benedictines live by a Rule written nearly 1,500 years ago.  Its wisdom and values have scarcely changed, and when we’ve made alterations to the daily routine, we’ve tended to stick with them for decades or even centuries at a time. Whatever else you may care to say about monks, spur-of-the-moment people we are not.

Still, nothing lasts 1,500 years if you never do anything for the first time.  Even St. Benedict recognized that, and he knew there would be times when monks would have to adapt.  In cold climates, which we enjoy on occasion in Minnesota, Benedict allowed his monks warmer clothing.  When monks did more strenuous manual labor he made provision for more food.  And to the abbot who had a better idea for the organization of the Psalms or the daily schedule, Benedict gave blanket permission to give it his best shot. After all, he meant his Rule to be a guide for living, not a straight-jacket.

img_3967We often think of change as something to resist as much as possible, but some change is unavoidable.  Take, for example, the flow of the seasons.  We’re unable to do a lot about that save to escape to other parts of the country — which itself is a form of change.  In ancient Israel they accepted the inevitability of spring, summer, fall and winter, and they harnessed that seasonal progression to teach something about our relationship with God.  The Hebrews incorporated into their cycle of worship harvest festivals, days of atonement and spring planting; and not surprisingly, early Christians did the same.

Even so, many in our own day are blissfully unaware that the liturgical calendar is linked so intimately to the changing seasons.  Now that we are in Advent we’ve begun the new Church year, and our celebration of the birth of Jesus at Christmas correlates with days that will slowly grow in length and begin to hint of the coming of spring and the flowering of his ministry.  Advent and the darkest days of winter reinforce one another wonderfully, unless of course you live in the southern  hemisphere.

img_3935What in the world might this suggest about our relationship with God?  At the very least, it seems to me, it hints that it’s not static.  Like the seasons, the course of our lives waxes and wanes.  To take a cue from the vows made at marriage, we all have good times and bad.  We all experience bouts of sickness and health.  Death will us all do part, someday.  But most of all, we each grow with the seasons — sometimes imperceptibly and at other times quite obviously.  We are all on pilgrimage, to cast this process in spiritual language, and experience teaches that we do not walk alone.  We walk alongside our fellow pilgrims, and we also walk with God.

As we change and mature, we tend to feel the pull to pray, and so it is that we pray alone and we pray together.  Prayer brings us into conversation both with God and with one another, and we do so because we all seek the wisdom to choose our next big steps in life.  It’s what comes naturally when we need to figure out the course of our actions.

img_3957I long ago realized how pointless it is to pray that things might never change.  That doesn’t mean I no longer pray for that.  Rather, I just realize it won’t happen, whatever I may have to say about it.  That was the bind that Peter found himself in at the Transfiguration.  He prayed that Jesus would let him build booths for Jesus, for Moses and for Elijah.  He wanted to prolong the moment, to which Jesus responded with the equivalent of “are you kidding me?  I have other stuff to do.”

Jesus is not kidding when he reminds us to wake up and get with the program.  Of course there will be stretches during which the observance of routine will be life-giving.  But we can never let “routine” degenerate into “rut.”  Routine certainly keeps chaos at bay in our lives, but it also prepares us for life’s surprises.  Routine allows us to pick out the voice of the shepherd when he calls us to seize the moment.  Routine is the foundation on which we build fruitful lives, and it prepares us for the occasion when we have to do some very important things — each for the very first time.

img_3948Notes

+On December 10th Bishop Donald Kettler visited the abbey and ordained our confrere Brother Isaiah Frederick as priest.  Fr. Isaiah grew up in Tucson, came to college at Saint John’s University, and for several years worked as an accountant with Price Waterhouse in Phoenix.  Since my work has taken me to Phoenix regularly through the years, I had the opportunity to visit with him there, before he came as a candidate to the monastery.  It is wonderful to have him as a confrere and priest in the abbey.

img_3972+This past week was fairly uneventful, save for one little incident that I could never have anticipated.  I made a brief trip to Portsmouth, NH, to meet with an alumnus of Saint John’s.  I arrived early and had a bit of time to explore the town, which I had never seen before.  I stepped into a gift shop, looked around, and saw pottery which I did not need and the card on which today’s post is based.  In the course of this, the woman working there asked if she could be of help.  So I inquired whether there was a good bookstore in Portsmouth, and she asked what kind of book I had in mind.  I told her non-fiction, biography.  “I have just the store for you.”  She then locked up her own shop and walked me four blocks to the hole-in-the-wall shop she had in mind.  She took me in, introduced me to the owner, and returned to her shop.  I was completely flabbergasted by her act of kindness, so much so that I bought a novel.  The fact that a stranger would extend such hospitality to a visitor to Portsmouth is proof enough of the existence of God.  On the other hand, I left with the distinct impression that this was not one of those things she had just done for the first time.

img_3969+Two years ago I found myself in Vienna during Advent.  Famous for its Christmas markets, the city comes alive with lights and casual outdoor conversation.  It’s cold, which makes it all the more exhilarating.  If you’ve not been there during this season, it’s one more thing to add to your list of things that you’ve never done for the first time.  Today’s photos show the Christmas market in front of the city hall of Vienna.

Read Full Post »